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2016 Australian Earth Science Olympiad Team

Australian Science Inovations ANU Canberra Australia. Students at summer school in there Science disiplines getting ready to compete in the Science Olympics in 2016. ASI contact tracey Byrne.
Jeffrey Brown
Redlands School
The ‘Olympic Games’ for high school science students beckons for Jeffrey Brown, a Year 12 student at Redlands School. He is travelling to Mie, Japan, for the International Earth Science Olympiad, but his journey started with sitting the Australian Science Olympiads Exam last August, a nationwide competition attracting thousands of students. Subsequently he progressed to the Australian Science Olympiads Summer School: a two week program of intensive science at the Australian National University. “One facility we used on multiple occasions was the amazing Geophysical Fluid Dynamics lab. We were modelling the flow of water currents and density currents,” says Jeffrey. He adds “I love the fact that earth science investigates the intricate mechanics behind specific processes. Yet it is concurrently able to take a ‘big picture’ approach to our understanding of how our planet behaves.” When not studying global energy transfers, he can be found cross-country running, swimming or debating. In the future, Jeffrey would like to be a leader for sustainable development.“The International Earth Science Olympiad is a great opportunity to meet and converse with the ‘best of the best’ in the world of earth science. I’m excited to visit a dynamic, well-organised, diverse and vibrant country: travelling from the bustling social centre of Tokyo, to becoming immersed in the culture and tradition of a seaside village.”

 


Australian Science Inovations ANU Canberra Australia. Students at summer school in there Science disiplines getting ready to compete in the Science Olympics in 2016. ASI contact tracey Byrne.
Daniel Ho
James Ruse Agricultural High School
Until the Australian Science Olympiad Exam in Earth and Environmental Science last year, Daniel Ho’s exposure to the subject had been limited. This didn’t stop him from discovering a passion and talent for earth science – now he is travelling overseas to represent Australia at the International Earth Science Olympiad in Mie, Japan. “The Australian Science Olympiad Exams are a great way to test your understanding of science outside of what is taught at school, and get a glimpse of the kind of knowledge scientists use in real life to tackle the problems of our society.” Taking part in this nationwide science competition then led to Daniel attending the Australian Science Olympiads Summer School at the Australian National University, where he learnt about crystal formation, lichens and black holes – just to name a few. The James Ruse Agricultural High School student enjoys the broad reach of earth and environmental science. His favourite part of preparing for the International Earth Science Olympiad has been “learning the science behind the processes shaping the Earth and appreciating the different scales on which these processes act.” His extracurricular interests include superhero movies, knitting, and finding out about the latest phones, laptops and computers. He is particularly looking forwards to exploring more of Japan’s culture while in Mie. Daniel aspires to study medicine.

 


Australian Science Inovations ANU Canberra Australia. Students at summer school in there Science disiplines getting ready to compete in the Science Olympics in 2016. ASI contact tracey Byrne.
Catriona Illingworth
Abbotsleigh
Studying earth science is taking high school student Catriona Illingworth quite literally across the planet. Soon she will be competing at the 2016 International Earth Science Olympiad in Mie, Japan, as part of the Australian team. Last year, Catriona sat the Australian Science Olympiad Exam in Earth and Environmental Science at her school. This nationwide competition is the first step in being selected to represent Australia at the ‘Olympics’ for high school science students from all over the globe. Catriona finds earth science fascinating as it explains much of what is happening in our environment. “Earth science is hands-on and relevant to current issues whilst being a theoretical and curiosity-driven discipline.” She is an active participant in her school’s environment council, and is a youth ambassador for 1 Million Women (a charity aimed at reducing carbon emissions by educating women to make changes within their homes and communities). The Abbotsleigh student is looking forwards to travelling to Japan. “One of the most unique aspects of the International Earth Science Olympiad is the opportunity to meet people my age who are just as excited about science as I am. To do this in a country such as Japan with a rich history, natural beauty and culture of innovation, is truly an honour.” In the future, Catriona wants to work to better the environment by implementing sustainable technologies within businesses and companies.

 


Australian Science Inovations ANU Canberra Australia. Students at summer school in there Science disiplines getting ready to compete in the Science Olympics in 2016. ASI contact tracey Byrne.
Winnie Yuan
Abbotsleigh
Winnie Yuan is a member of the Australian team competing at the 2016 International Earth Science Olympiad in Mie, Japan. For the enthusiastic Abbotsleigh student, the first step to joining some of the brightest young minds in the world at the Olympiad was the Australian Science Olympiad Exam in Earth and Environmental Science. “ The Australian Science Olympiad Exams are a brilliant opportunity to engage with science outside of the usual school experience. They enable you to extend your knowledge and understanding as well as explore scientific interests to a really advanced level.” Doing well in this nationwide competition then led to attending the Australian Science Olympiads Summer School at the Australian National University: “I was incredibly fortunate to have had the opportunity to be part of the Summer School, probably one of the most memorable fortnights of my life. The people who were involved made it a lot of fun and I’m grateful to have been able to make so many great friends!”
Winnie enjoys the applicability of earth science to the world. “It’s fantastic to be able to walk outside and view everyday features of the environment from an interesting scientific perspective I didn’t realise existed before studying earth science.”
Winnie’s passion for the environment saw her present at the 2014 IUCN World Parks Congress. Her extra-curricular interests include music, art and debating.